Get Started
Get Started
570-558-0290

Human beings were designed to move…walk, run, climb, lift, hunt, and gather. Contemporary man has suffered greatly from a technologically driven inactive and sedentary lifestyle. Inactivity is associated with many health problems; obesity, adult-onset diabetes, high blood pressure to name a few. The problems associated with lack of movement are many:

Constipation

The more you move your body, the more you colon moves!  A regular and consistent exercise and activity regime, results in a more consistent bowel schedule, especially with age. Healthy muscle tone in your abdominal muscles and diaphragm is also the key to moving waste through your digestive tract.

Stiff Joints

Osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and many inflammatory or auto-immune diseases can cause achy and stiff joints. However, even healthy joints can also stiffen when you don’t use them enough. Put them to work so they don't get tight and cause pain.

Shortness of Breath

All muscles get weak from lack of use, including the muscles that help your lungs expand and contract as you breathe if you don’t work them out regularly. The less exercise or activity you do, the more you experience shortness of breath, even during easy daily tasks.

Depression or Moody

Physical problems are not the only complication of inactivity. A lack of movement can also increase feelings of anxiety and depression. Aerobic exercises like walking, biking, swimming, or running, have been proven to stimulate endorphins to boost and steady your mood, and even improve your self-esteem.

Lack of Energy

Many studies have found that regular movement improves energy. Exercise helps deliver oxygen and nutrients to your tissues. When you sit or are inactive, tissues are not getting the same amount of fuel they need to keep you going.

Slow Metabolism

Movement stimulates your metabolism. Hyperactive people burn more calories…just by fidgeting! Even if you are not hyperactive, the more active you are, the more calories you burn each time you move.

Difficulty Sleeping

One of the first recommendations sleep doctors make to their patients suffering from insomnia is exercise. When you keep a regular exercise routine, you fall asleep faster, and you sleep deeper once you drift off.

Brain Fog

Regular exercise tells your body to make more chemicals called growth factors. They boost blood vessel production in your brain. The more blood that gets to your brain, the better you can think, remember, and make decisions.

High Blood Pressure

Spending most of your time sitting raises your risk of heart disease, in great part due to the fact that partly you’re more likely to have high blood pressure. This is a big risk factor for heart issues like coronary artery disease and heart attack.

High Blood Glucose

When physical activity is a regular part of your life, your body has an easier time keeping your blood glucose under control. Exercise can stabilize blood sugar levels and keep you out of the type 2 diabetes danger zone.

Lower Back Pain

When your core muscles are weak from lack of use, they can’t support your back the way they should. This makes it much easier to tweak your back muscles during everyday movements like standing or reaching. Pilates, yoga, and other exercises that use stretching are good for building a stronger back. Schedule an appointment with a good orthopedic and sports PT.

Hunger Pains … “Hangry”

Logically, one might think that you’d be hungry more often if you exercised more, but the opposite is usually true. Aerobic exercise like biking, swimming, walking, and running can actually decrease your appetite because it changes the levels of certain “hunger hormones” in your body.

Sick Often

Studies show the more moderate activity you get, the lower your chance of catching a cold or other germs. When you make exercise a habit, your immune system gets stronger.

Dull and Pasty Skin

If your skin looks duller than usual, a lack of movement may be to blame. Some studies show that moderate exercise boosts your circulation and your immune system, which helps your skin keep that youthful glow.

SOURCE: WebMD

EVERY MONDAY – Read Dr. Paul J. Mackarey “Health & Exercise Forum!” via Blog

EVERY SUNDAY in "The Sunday Times" - Read Dr. Paul J. Mackarey “Health & Exercise Forum!” in hard copy

This article is not intended as a substitute for medical treatment. If you have questions related to your medical condition, please contact your family physician. For further inquires related to this topic email: drpmackarey@msn.com

Paul J. Mackarey PT, DHSc, OCS is a Doctor in Health Sciences specializing in orthopaedic and sports physical therapy in Scranton and Clarks Summit. Dr. Mackarey is in private practice and is an associate professor of clinical medicine at Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine. For all of Dr. Mackarey's articles, visit our exercise forum!

Several years ago, while hiking to the bottom of the Grand Canyon with my family, my wife Esther developed “canyon knee,” also known as “hiker’s knee” or in medical terms, “patellar tendonitis.” Regardless of the term, the end result was that she had severe pain in the tendon below her knee cap and was unable to walk up the trail to get out of the canyon. In addition to ice, rest, bracing, and non-steroidal anti inflammatory medications, the National Park Ranger insisted that she use two trekking poles on her ascent to the rim.

Prior to that experience, I always thought that “walking, hiking sticks or trekking poles” were for show or those in need of a walking aide. Well, I could not have been more incorrect. Needless to say, Esther made it out of the canyon safely and, with the use of our life saving trekking poles; we have lived “happily ever after!” Now, 15 years later, I rarely walk more than 5 miles without my poles.

As a result of this experience, I have been recommending walking or trekking poles to my patients. These poles are an essential part of hiking or distance walking gear, for the novice and expert alike. Specifically, for those over 50 who have degenerative arthritis and pain in their lower back, hips, knees, ankles or feet, these simple devices have been shown to improve the efficiency of the exercise and lessen the impact on the spine and lower extremities. Additionally, using poles reduces the likelihood of ankle sprains and falls during walking. Trekking poles are also a safe option for those with compromised balance. If you want to walk distances for exercise and need a little stability but don’t want the stigma of a cane, trekking poles are for you.

History of the Hiking Stick:

Early explorers, Europeans and Native Americans have been using walking sticks for centuries. More recently, in the 1968 classic hiker’s bible, “The Complete Walker,” Colin Fletcher praised his “walking staff” for its multipurpose use: for balance and assistance with walking and climbing, protection from rattlesnakes, and for use as a fishing rod. Today, these sticks are now versatile poles made from light-weight materials.

Trekking Pole Features:

Trekking poles are made of light-weight aluminum and vary in cost and quality. But, like most things, “you get what you pay for!” These hollow tubes can telescope to fit any person and collapse to pack in luggage for travel. Better poles offer multiple removable tips for various uses, conditions and terrains. For example, abasket to prevent sinking too deeply in snow, mud or sand; a blunt rubber tip for hard surfaces like asphalt or concrete, or the pointed metal tip to grip ice or hard dirt/gravel. Better quality poles offer an ergonomic hand grip and strap and a spring system to absorb shock through your hands, wrists and arms upon impact.

The poles should be properly adjusted to fit each individual. When your hand is griping the handle the elbow should be at a 90 degree angle. Proper use is simple; just walk with a normal gait pattern of opposite arm and leg swing. For example, left leg and right arm/pole swings forward to plant while the left arm/pole remain behind with the right leg .  

This pattern is reciprocated with as normal gait advances (opposite arm and leg). I have been very pleased with my moderately priced poles (Cascade Mountain Tech from Dick’s Sporting Goods ($34.99 per pole). Prices range from $19.99 to 79.95 per pole. dickssportinggoods.com; montem.com; leki.com; rei.com. However, if you travel frequently to hike the State and National Parks, you may want to purchase more expensive poles that collapse and retighten more efficiently. (montem.com; leki.com;) 

Montem Trekking Poles - with close-up of easy adjustable locking clasp.

Research:

There are numerous studies to support the use of trekking poles, especially research that supports their use for health and safety. One study compared hikers in 3 different conditions; no backpack, a pack with 15% body weight and a pack with 30% body weight. Biomechanical analysis was performed blindly on the three groups and a significant reduction in forces on lower extremity joints (hip, knee, and ankle) was noted for all three groups when using poles compared to those not using poles.

Another study confirmed that trekking poles reduced the incidence of ankle fractures through improved balance and stability. Additional studies support the theory that trekking poles reduce exercise induced muscle soreness from hiking or walking steep terrain and another study found that while less energy is expended in the lower body muscles using poles, increase energy is used in the upper body; therefore, the net caloric expenditure is equal as it is simply transferred from the legs to the arms.

Reasons to Use Trekking Poles:

In conclusion, it is important to remember that trekking poles for hiking or distance walking are much more than a style statement. They are proven to be an invaluable tool for health, safety and wellness by reducing lower extremity joint stress, improving stability and balance, and enhancing efficiency for muscle recovery.    

Sources: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. The Complete Walker, by Colin Fletcher

Model: Andrea Molitoris, PT, DPT at Mackarey Physical Therapy

EVERY MONDAY – Read Dr. Paul J. Mackarey “Health & Exercise Forum!” via Blog

EVERY SUNDAY in "The Sunday Times" - Read Dr. Paul J. Mackarey “Health & Exercise Forum!” in hard copy

This article is not intended as a substitute for medical treatment. If you have questions related to your medical condition, please contact your family physician. For further inquires related to this topic email: drpmackarey@msn.com

Paul J. Mackarey PT, DHSc, OCS is a Doctor in Health Sciences specializing in orthopaedic and sports physical therapy in Scranton and Clarks Summit. Dr. Mackarey is in private practice and is an associate professor of clinical medicine at Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine. For all of Dr. Mackarey's articles, visit our exercise forum!

There is little doubt that the workplace has been redefined since the pandemic as many employees continue to work from home. Sitting for many hours at a workstation that may not be optimal has also changed the way we define workplace health and safety. It may be more important than ever to pay close attention to designing an ergonomic workstation, changing position, and stretching regularly to prevent injury.

Since 1894 Labor Day has been designated as the national holiday that pays tribute to the contributions and achievements of American workers. Research supports the notion that healthier employees are happier and more productive. When employers encourage healthy behavior and safety at work, they benefit in many ways. For example, in addition to improving job satisfaction and productivity, healthy employees save money by using less sick time, worker’s compensation benefits and health benefits. For example, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 75 percent of employers” health care costs are related to chronic medical problems such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. De-conditioned, overweight employees are more likely to suffer from these preventable conditions and are at greater risk for injury. Employers, please consider using this holiday as an opportunity to start a health promotion program at your workplace…have a health fair, offer healthy snacks, encourage walking, smoking cessation, exercising at lunch, and offer fitness club stipends.  

Lower back pain, one of the costliest illnesses to employers, is one example of a problem which can be prevented with a good health and safety program. It is widely accepted in the medical community that the best treatment for lower back pain (LBP) is prevention. Keeping fit, (flexible and strong), practicing good posture, and using proper body mechanics are essential in the prevention of LBP. At our clinic, significant time and effort is spent emphasizing the importance of these concepts to our patients, employees, and the businesses we work with through industrial medicine programs. A comprehensive approach can produce significant reductions in LBP injuries through an onsite safety program which promotes education, wellness, body mechanics, lifting techniques, postural and stretching exercises and ergonomics. 

Prevention of Lower Back Pain

1. Maintain Fitness Level

As little as 10 extra pounds puts great stress on your lower back. It also makes it more difficult to maintain good posture. Eat well, exercise regularly and don’t smoke. Smokers have a much higher incidence of LBP and failure from lower back surgery.

2. Practice Good Posture & Body Mechanics

Good posture is critical for a healthy back. When sitting, standing or walking maintain a slight arch in your lower back, keep shoulders back, and head over your shoulders. In sitting, use a towel roll or small pillow in the small of the back. Also, consider sitting on a physio ball, which promotes proper posture for part of the day.

Sitting at Workstation
Sitting at Workstation with Physioball

 Perform postural exercises throughout the day. Most of the day we sit, stand, and reaching forward and bend our spine. These exercises are designed to stretch your back in the opposite direction of flexion. Please perform slowly, hold for 3-5 seconds and repeat 6 times each 6 times per day.

Chin Tuck: Tuck your chin back to bring your head over shoulders.

Shoulder Blade Pinch: Pinch your shoulder blades together.

Standing Extension: While standing, put your hands behind back and extend lower back 10-20 degrees.

Good Body Mechanics and ergonomics are also important in the prevention of LBP. When lifting, think twice. Think about the weight, shape and size of the object. Think about where the object is going and the surface resistance of the floor. Does it require two people to lift? Can I safely lift that high or bend that low?

When bending to lift an object think about safety:

Proper Lifting Technique:

Visit your doctor regularly and listen to your body.   

Model: Lexi DiGregorio, PTA  

NEXT SUNDAY IN THE PAPER AND EVERY MONDAY'S BLOG – Read Dr. Paul J. Mackarey “Health & Exercise Forum!”

This article is not intended as a substitute for medical treatment. If you have questions related to your medical condition, please contact your family physician. For further inquires related to this topic email: drpmackarey@msn.com

Paul J. Mackarey PT, DHSc, OCS is a Doctor in Health Sciences specializing in orthopaedic and sports physical therapy. Dr. Mackarey is in private practice and is an associate professor of clinical medicine at GCSOM. For all of Dr. Paul's articles, check out our exercise forum!

Covid-19 has certainly redefined the workplace as many employees continue to work from home. Prolonged hours sitting at a workstation that may not be optimal has also changed the way we define workplace health and safety. It may be more important than ever to pay close attention to designing an ergonomic workstation, changing position, and stretching regularly to prevent injury.

Since 1894 Labor Day has been designated as the national holiday that pays tribute to the contributions and achievements of American workers. Research supports the notion that healthier employees are happier and more productive. When employers encourage healthy behavior and safety at work, they benefit in many ways. For example, in addition to improving job satisfaction and productivity, healthy employees save money by using less sick time, worker’s compensation benefits and health benefits. For example, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 75 percent of employers” health care costs are related to chronic medical problems such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. Deconditioned, overweight employees are more likely to suffer from these preventable conditions and are at greater risk for injury. Employers, please consider using this holiday as an opportunity to start a health promotion program at your workplace…have a health fair, offer healthy snacks, encourage walking, smoking cessation, exercising at lunch, and offer fitness club stipends.   

Lower back pain, one of the costliest illnesses to employers, is one example of a problem which can be prevented with a good health and safety program. It is widely accepted in the medical community that the best treatment for lower back pain (LBP) is prevention. Keeping fit, (flexible and strong), practicing good posture, and using proper body mechanics are essential in the prevention of LBP. At our clinic, significant time and effort is spent emphasizing the importance of these concepts to our patients, employees, and the businesses we work with through industrial medicine programs. A comprehensive approach can produce significant reductions in LBP injuries through an onsite safety program which promotes education, wellness, body mechanics, lifting techniques, postural and stretching exercises and ergonomics. 

Prevention of Lower Back Pain

When bending to lift an object think about safety:

Visit your doctor regularly and listen to your body.     

NEXT MONDAY – Read Dr. Paul J. Mackarey “Health & Exercise Forum!”

This article is not intended as a substitute for medical treatment. If you have questions related to your medical condition, please contact your family physician. For further inquires related to this topic email: drpmackarey@msn.com

Paul J. Mackarey PT, DHSc, OCS is a Doctor in Health Sciences specializing in orthopaedic and sports physical therapy. Dr. Mackarey is in private practice and is an associate professor of clinical medicine at GCSOM.

For all of Dr. Mackarey's articles visit: mackareyphysicaltherapy.com

More than 65 million people, almost 30% of the population in the United States, are actively involved in providing 20 or more hours of care for a chronically ill, disabled, or aged family member or friend each week. As our population continues to age, this number is expected to grow rapidly.

The role of a caregiver is multifaceted and often involves tasks and skills beyond the education or comfort level of most providers. Some examples include; managing money, paying bills, shopping, cleaning, maintaining and repairing a home, dispensing and injecting medications, cleaning wounds, changing dressings, catheter management, bed baths, assisting in position changes, transferring from the bed to the chair, ambulation, stair climbing, bathroom assistance for toileting and showering and many other responsibilities. Consequently, a caregiver is often at risk for mental, spiritual and physical fatigue or breakdown. It is no surprise that depression, illness and injury often plague a caregiver and eventually, the caregiver is in need of a caregiver. One of the most common injuries suffered by a caregiver is back pain.    

Lower back pain (LBP) is one of the most common problems in our society. Over 90% of all Americans will suffer from it at least once in their lives. It is generally agreed that prevention is the best treatment for LBP.

TIPS FOR THE PREVENTION OF BACK PAIN FOR THE CAREGIVER

Maintain Health & Fitness Level

As little as 10 extra pounds puts great stress on your lower back. It also makes it more difficult to maintain good posture. Eat well and exercise regularly.

Aerobic Exercise

Aerobic exercise will help prevent weight gain and stiffness for a healthier lower back. It will also help with the stress and depression associated with providing care for a loved one. Perform mild aerobic exercise such as walking 3-5 times per week for 30-45 minutes. You can also use an elliptical or bike at home while your loved one is resting. Get outdoors and take multiple short walks …go around the block a few times per day.

Core Exercises

Core stabilization exercises designed to strengthen the abdominal and lower back muscles will help prevent injury. Some examples of core exercises are:

Pelvic Tilt - lying on your back and performing a pelvic tilt as you flatten you lower back into the floor.

Pelvic Tilt and Heel Slide - lying on your back, hold a pelvic tilt as you slide your one heel up and down and repeat with the other heel.

Core on Ball - Perform arm exercises such as biceps and triceps with light weight while sitting on a therapeutic ball while simultaneously trying to hold an isometric contraction of your abdominal and lower back muscles.

Do Not Smoke

Smoking effects natural healing because it constricts the small blood vessels. Smokers have a much higher incidence of LBP and failure from lower back surgery.

Practice Good Posture & Body Mechanics

Good posture is critical for a healthy back. When sitting, standing or walking maintain a slight arch in your lower back, keep shoulders back, and head over your shoulders. In sitting, use a towel roll or small pillow in the small of the back.

Caregivers spend much of the day with their spine bent over a bed or chair feeding, bathing, and lifting a loved one. Postural exercises are designed to stretch your back in the opposite direction of this forward flexed position. Examples include:

Ergonomics

From Lying to Sitting in Bed (Photo 1)

Bend your knees, maintain an arch in the back with head up, and bend over as little as possible. Bend the knees of your loved one; roll their trunk toward you to get their legs over the edge of the bed as you pivot their weight on their butt to get them sitting upright.

Photo 1

From Sitting in Bed to Sitting in Chair (Photo 2)

Bend your knees, maintain an arch in the back with head up, and bend over as little as possible. Place your hands around the waist or on a transfer belt. Use your legs, turn with feet, and do not twist spine. Block the feet and knees of your loved-one with your feet and knees and use them to pivot and transfer from the bed to the chair. Be sure the chair is along side of the bed and arm of chair removed if possible before the lift.

Photo 2

Transfer Belt - Use a transfer belt around the waist of the patient. Grip the transfer belt, instead of the patient or clothing, during the lift or when ambulating. Lower Back Lifting Belt - Also, if you have a back problem, consider using a lifting belt or back brace to protect your back when lifting the patient. Immediately following the lift, stand up straight and stretch lower back into extension.

Transfer belts and lower back lifting belts can be found online or at your local pharmacy.

Lift Chair – For patients that require maximum or moderate assistance and only one caregiver is available to lift or transfer, an electric lift chair should be considered.

NEXT MONDAY – Read Dr. Paul J. Mackarey “Health & Exercise Forum!”

This article is not intended as a substitute for medical treatment. If you have questions related to your medical condition, please contact your family physician. For further inquires related to this topic email: drpmackarey@msn.com

Paul J. Mackarey PT, DHSc, OCS is a Doctor in Health Sciences specializing in orthopaedic and sports physical therapy. Dr. Mackarey is in private practice in downtown Scranton and is an associate professor of clinical medicine at GCSOM. 

Visit your doctor regularly and listen to your body.     

For all of Dr. Mackarey's articles visit: https://mackareyphysicaltherapy.com/forum/

Holiday shopping is stressful to your body as well as your wallet. Driving from store to store, getting in and out of the car, bundled in a sweater and winter coat, the expert shopper carries package after package from the store, to the car, over and over again. Six, eight, or ten hours later, the shopper arrives home exhausted, only to realize that 15, or 20 packages must be carried from the car into the house. This dilemma is compounded by the fact that the rain turned to sleet, and the sleet to snow. Travel by car and foot are treacherous. You are slipping and sliding all the way from the car to the house while carrying multiple packages of various sizes and shapes. The shopping bags get wet and tear, forcing you to tilt your body as you carry the packages. Of course, no one is home to help you unload the car and you make the trip several times alone. You get into the house exhausted and crash onto the couch. You fall asleep slouched and slumped in an overstuffed pillow chair. Hours later you wake up with a stiff neck and lower back pain. You wonder what happened to your neck and back. Consider the following:

Other Tips:

Plan Ahead: It is very stressful on your spirit, wallet and back to do all of your shopping in the three weeks available after Thanksgiving. Even though we dislike “rushing” past Thanksgiving to the next holiday, try to begin holiday shopping in before 

Use the Internet: Supporting local businesses is important. However, Internet shopping can save you lots of wear and tear. Sometimes, you can even get a gift wrapped.

Gift Certificates: While gift certificates may be impersonal, they are easy, convenient and can also be purchased over the internet.

Perform Stretching Exercises: Chin Tucks, Shoulder Blade Pinch, Back Extension. Stretch intermittently throughout the shopping day…try the three exercises below, gently, slowly, hold 3 seconds and relax, repeat 5 times.

NEXT MONDAY – Read Dr. Paul J. Mackarey “Health & Exercise Forum!”  

This article is not intended as a substitute for medical treatment. If you have questions related to your medical condition, please contact your family physician. For further inquires related to this topic email: drpmackarey@msn.com

For all of Dr. Mackarey's Articles visit: mackareyphysicaltherapy.com/forum

Paul J. Mackarey PT, DHSc, OCS is a Doctor in Health Sciences specializing in orthopaedic and sports physical therapy. Dr. Mackarey is in private practice and is an associate professor of clinical medicine at Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine.

Tips on Low Back Pain

Covid-19 has certainly redefined the workplace as many employees continue to work from home. Prolonged hours sitting at a workstation that may not be optimal has also changed the way we define workplace health and safety. It may be more important than ever to pay close attention to designing an ergonomic workstation, changing position, and stretching regularly to prevent injury.

Since 1894 Labor Day has been designated as the national holiday that pays tribute to the contributions and achievements of American workers. Research supports the notion that healthier employees are happier and more productive. When employers encourage healthy behavior and safety at work, they benefit in many ways. For example, in addition to improving job satisfaction and productivity, healthy employees save money by using less sick time, worker’s compensation benefits and health benefits. For example, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 75 percent of employers” health care costs are related to chronic medical problems such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. Deconditioned, overweight employees are more likely to suffer from these preventable conditions and are at greater risk for injury. Employers, please consider using this holiday as an opportunity to start a health promotion program at your workplace…have a health fair, offer healthy snacks, encourage walking, smoking cessation, exercising at lunch, and offer fitness club stipends.   

 Lower back pain, one of the costliest illnesses to employers, is one example of a problem which can be prevented with a good health and safety program. It is widely accepted in the medical community that the best treatment for lower back pain (LBP) is prevention. Keeping fit, (flexible and strong), practicing good posture, and using proper body mechanics are essential in the prevention of LBP. At our clinic, significant time and effort is spent emphasizing the importance of these concepts to our patients, employees, and the businesses we work with through industrial medicine programs. A comprehensive approach can produce significant reductions in LBP injuries through an onsite safety program which promotes education, wellness, body mechanics, lifting techniques, postural and stretching exercises and ergonomics. 

Prevention of Lower Back Pain

Maintain Fitness Level

As little as 10 extra pounds puts great stress on your lower back. It also makes it more difficult to maintain good posture. Eat well, exercise regularly and don’t smoke. Smokers have a much higher incidence of LBP and failure from lower back surgery.

Practice Good Posture & Body Mechanics

Good posture is critical for a healthy back. When sitting, standing or walking maintain a slight arch in your lower back, keep shoulders back, and head over your shoulders. In sitting, use a towel roll or small pillow in the small of the back.

Perform postural exercises throughout the day. Most of the day we sit, stand, and reaching forward and bend our spine. These exercises are designed to stretch your back in the opposite direction of flexion. Please perform slowly, hold for 3-5 seconds and repeat 6 times each 6 times per day.

Chin Tuck: Tuck your chin back to bring your head over shoulders.

Shoulder Blade Pinch: Pinch your shoulder blades together.

Standing Extension: While standing, put your hands behind back and extend lower back 10-20 degrees.

Good Body Mechanics and ergonomics are also important in the prevention of LBP. When lifting, think twice. Think about the weight, shape and size of the object. Think about where the object is going and the surface resistance of the floor. Does it require two people to lift? Can I safely lift that high or bend that low?

When bending to lift an object think about safety:

NEXT MONDAY – Read Dr. Paul J. Mackarey “Health & Exercise Forum!”

This article is not intended as a substitute for medical treatment. If you have questions related to your medical condition, please contact your family physician. For further inquires related to this topic email: drpmackarey@msn.com

For all of Dr. Mackarey's articles visit : https://mackareyphysicaltherapy.com/forum/

HEALTH AND EXERCISE FORUM

By: Dr. Paul J. Mackarey

This column is a monthly feature of “Health & Exercise Forum” in association with the students and faculty of Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine (formerly The Commonwealth Medical College).

Heat vs. Cold

Guest Columnist: Kevin Perry, MD

“Should I use heat or ice?” Several years ago, while working as a third year medical student at TCMC on orthopedic rotation, I was surprised to find that this is one of the most common questions asked by weekend warriors trying to relieve shoulder pain after playing tennis for the first time in 6 months. Now, as an orthopedic resident, the frequency of this inquiry has not changed. Trying to decide whether to use ice or heat to make it feel better and heal faster may not be so easy. Unfortunately, there is confusion, even among medical professionals, about the appropriate times to use  heat or cold. However, if we review the basic science on this subject, there are some valuable guidelines to consider.

The Science

When an injury is sustained, such as a sprained ankle, chemical signals are released in the area of the injury, which increases blood supply to the damaged tissues to allow appropriate cells to repair the damage. This response is evident by the principle signs and symptoms of inflammation including heat, redness, swelling, pain, and loss of function. This reaction makes sense because anytime tissues are injured; the body is responsible to protect the site until repair can occur. To protect the injured site, the body causes swelling and pain to prevent excessive movement or overuse which will lead to further injury. With the site of injury protected, the appropriate cells are able to lay down new tissue to repair the damage. As tissues heal, a web of connective tissue pulls the damaged tissues back together and holds them in place while new tissue is formed. Once the tissue is completely repaired, the blood flow returns to normal and fluid drains from the site of injury allowing restoration of motion and function. However, the new tissue is fragile and unorganized and often sticks together leaving tightness and weakness. After repeated use, the new tissue adapts to the stress placed upon it and becomes functional.

The Application

When grounded in science, the use of heat or cold can be used to expedite the healing process. While inflammation is crucial to the repair of injured tissue, the response can be exaggerated and last longer than necessary. Therefore, ice and heat can be used to modify the bodies’ inflammatory response and help us return to activity sooner.

How Cold Works

Ice causes blood vessels to narrow and nerves to slow down. When ice is applied to tissue, the body responds by decreasing blood flow to the area to preserve the core body temperature. Also, as nerves cool down, the signals they send slow down and become less frequent, so the pain signals they send to your brain become less intense. Thus, we can use ice to decrease blood flow to inflamed tissue which will reduce swelling and decrease pain. Ice is ideally used immediately following most injuries to control pain and swelling.

How Heat Works

Heat causes your blood vessels to open and increase blood flow to tissues. When heat is applied, blood flow and tissue temperature are increased and tight tissues relax and are better able to glide across one another. However, when applied too early in the healing process, heat, by increasing blood flow, can increase swelling and pain. Heat is ideally used after an injury has healed and there is residual tightness or protective muscle spasms. 

Now that we know how ice and heat work in conjunction with the inflammatory process we can easily understand when to use each one. Ice is best used following an acute injury. For example, ice is effective day one through three following an ankle sprain, or until swelling is controlled. Anytime the principle signs and symptoms of inflammation are present, ice is the appropriate treatment of choice. Regardless of when the injury occurred, if there is swelling and pain, ice is the appropriate treatment.   Heat should be used when there is tightness and stiffness and no signs of acute inflammation. For example, week two of three, following an ankle sprain if stiffness persists and swelling is controlled.

How To…

Apply ice using a bag of ice and water, ice pack, or bag of frozen vegetables wrapped in a wet towel. Cover the injured and swollen area and if possible elevate the iced area above the level of your heart. You should apply ice for a maximum of 20 minutes and rest at least one hour between icing sessions so as not to cause harm. Never apply ice directly to skin and never fall asleep while icing.

Apply heat with a heating pad covered in a few towels or warm a bag of rice in a microwave. Cover in a towel and place the heat on the affected area for a maximum of 20 minutes and rest at least one hour between heating sessions. Never apply heat over skin that you cannot feel (numbness or loss of sensation) or on open wounds in the skin. Also, do not lie directly on the heating source and don’t fall asleep while using heat to avoid burns.

Hopefully this information is helpful in dispelling some of the confusion regarding when to use ice or heat. As you can see there is no “golden rule” or “72-hour rule” for advising when to use ice or heat. But if you stick to the principles discussed in this article, you should be treating your aches and pains appropriately. This has been a simplified explanation of a complex topic and if you have any further questions, please ask a medical professional.

Top Reasons for use of Ice (Cryotherapy):

Top Reasons for use of Heat (Thermotherapy):

  • - Chronic Stable Low Back Pain  (Example: Healed Lumbar Strain)
  • - Postural Neck Pain (Example: Trigger Points)
  • - Prior to exercise/activity (Example: Rehabilitation)
  • - Osteoarthritis with stiffness (Example: Morning stiffness)
  • - Muscle Spasms (Example: Overuse)

Kevin Perry, MD graduated from The Commonwealth Medical College (GCSOM) in 2015. He is a resident in Orthopaedic Surgery at LSU Health Science Center Shreveport and will be moving back to Pennsylvania next month to pursuit a fellowship in orthopedic trauma at Penn State Health Milton S Hershey Medical Center. His special interests include pelvis and acetabulum trauma, complex periarticular fractures, malunions, nonunions, and deformity correction. Dr Perry completed his undergraduate education at Loyola University Maryland and graduate degree (doctor of physical therapy) at the University of Scranton.

Read all of Dr. Mackarey's articles in the Health and Exercise Forum at our website: https://mackareyphysicaltherapy.com/forum/

Read “Health & Exercise Forum” – Every Monday.  This article is not intended as a substitute for medical treatment. If you have questions related to your medical condition, please contact your family physician. For further inquires related to this topic email: drpmackarey@msn.com

Paul J. Mackarey PT, DHSc, OCS is a Doctor  in Health Sciences specializing in orthopaedic and sports physical therapy. Dr. Mackarey is in private practice and is an associate professor of clinical medicine at GCSOM.

Part II of II

I think we would all agree, technology is a wonderful thing. However, like all good things, it comes at a price. Students and workers alike are suffering from the many physical effects of sitting for too many hours...especially with COVID-19 home confinement! Studies show the impact of prolonged sitting, especially with poor posture, are multifaceted: pain, headaches, vision problems, poor concentration, excess fat storage with weight gain. Studies strongly support the use of using good posture, ergonomic workstations, posture stretches and frequent changes of positions, including the use of standing desks to prevent pain and injury as we discussed last week in part I.

The Problem is Gravity!

The average head weighs 10 to 12 pounds and when tilted down at a 45 degree angle the forces of gravity are multiplied by 5. While reading, studying or working on the computer with poor posture, one must support 50 or more pounds of pressure on the neck, middle and lower back for hours on end. It is no wonder why this activity is associated with headaches, neck and back pain, numbness and tingling in arms and legs, muscle spasms etc.  Some studies report the lifetime prevalence of neck and shoulder pain in office workers as high as 80%.

Spine problems can be prevented with good posture and proper body mechanics. Poor posture and improper body mechanics subject the spine to abnormal stresses that, over time, can lead to degeneration and pain. Good posture and proper body mechanics and frequent changes in positions, can minimize current spine pain and prevent recurrent episodes. Posture is the position in which you hold your body upright against gravity. Good posture involves positions that place the least amount of stress on the spine. Good posture maintains the spine in a “neutral” position. In a neutral spine, the three normal curves are preserved (a small hollow at the base of the neck, a small roundness at the midback and a small hollow in the low back). When viewed from the side, the upper back appears straight with a small hollow in the lower back.

GOOD POSTURE

Standing: Feet should be shoulder width apart. Distribute body weight evenly through both feet. Do not lock knees. Maintain a small hollow in lower back with “tailbone” slightly tucked down. Lift the breastbone by drawing shoulder blades back and down. Make chin level. Earlobes should be in line with the middle of shoulders. Relax jaw and neck muscles by resting tongue on the roof of mouth.

Sitting: Sit in a firm, high-back, straight-back chair. Buttocks should touch the back of chair while maintaining a small space between the back of knees and the seat of the chair. Distribute body weight evenly on both hips. Maintain an arch in the low back. A lumbar roll is recommended. It is a foam roll, 4” to 5” in diameter and 12” long, placed at belt level. Place feet flat on the floor with hips and knees bent at a right angle. Keep knees even with or slightly higher than hips. Use a footstool or footrest if necessary. Do not cross legs! Lift the breastbone by drawing shoulder blades back and down. Earlobes should be in line with the middle of shoulders. Position the armrests properly allowing elbows and forearms to rest with shoulders relaxed. If armrests are too high shoulders will shrug up and if too low will cause slouching.

POSTURE EXERCISES

The following exercises should be performed throughout the day as a break from sitting, studying or working at home, school or the office. They should be performed gently, slowly, held for 3-5 seconds and repeated 5-10 times. The exercises should only cause a slight stretch but NOT PAIN.

CHIN TUCKS: sit or stand up straight, bring your head over your shoulders as if to make a double chin.
SHOULDER BLADE PINCH: sit or stand up straight and pinch your shoulder blades together as if rowing a boat.
STANDING EXTENSION: place your hands on your hips and bend backwards from the waist.
PRONE LYING EXTENSION: while lying on your belly, prop yourself up on your elbows and extend your back. If no stretch is felt, then extend your elbows for better stretch.
PROPER SITTING ERGONOMICS
PROPER STANDING ERGONOMICS

For all of Dr. Mackarey's Articles visit our health care forum at https://mackareyphysicaltherapy.com/forum/

Dr. Mackarey’s Health & Exercise Forum – every Monday

This article is not intended as a substitute for medical treatment. If you have questions related to your medical condition, please contact your family physician. For further inquires related to this topic email: drpmackarey@msn.com. Paul J. Mackarey PT, DHSc, OCS is a Doctor  in Health Sciences specializing in orthopaedic and sports physical therapy. Dr. Mackarey is in private practice and is an associate professor of clinical medicine at Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine.